Dysentary

Health Issues/Symptoms Connections

"Dysentary" Issue / Symptom Connections

Below you will find various relationships to, and potential clinical treatment approaches for dysentary.

It is critical to appreciate that in Chinese Medicine, treatment for "dysentary" is rarely focused on the symptoms exclusively. Alternatively, a practitioner is looking at the factors that led to the development of "dysentary" - i.e. the "cause(s)".

For non-practitioners, we recommend reading treating the "cause" and not the "symptoms" for more on the overall approach and the importance of the TCM diagnostic system in formulating treatment approaches.

Within TCM, "dysentary" is potentially related to one or more of the following diagnostic patterns: large intestine cold, large intestine damp heat, spleen and stomach damp heat, spleen invasion - cold damp, stomach cold, stomach dampness, and/or stomach qi deficiency.

The above patterns are common examples. In clinical situations, however, there are any number of other possibilities. Many times there will be a layered combination of patterns in an interwoven blend with their symptoms - some being the cause of an issue and the result of another issue. While initially complex, this is illustrative of the the web of relationships that Chinese Medicine is designed to approach.

Some acupuncture points are considered "empirically" related to a specific condition or diagnostic pattern. While this would rarely, if ever, dictate the entire composition of a treatment, the following points should be considered, possibly even more so within the context of acupressure:

  • View KD 21 (Dark Gate)

        6 cun above CV 8, .5 cun lateral to CV 14.

        Local point for abdominal and intestinal pain and functional issues. Reflux, vomiting, food stagnation, dystenary - harmonizes stomach. Liver stagnation affecting the breasts - insufficient lactation, breast distention.
  • View SP 4 (Yellow Emperor)

        In a depression distal and inferior to the base of the 1st metatarsal bone at the junction of the red and white skin.

        Excess pathologies of the ST and Intestines - severe abdominal a/or epigastric pain, dysentery, food poisoning. Gynecological and Abdominal issues due to stagnation of Qi and Blood - masses, fibroids, cysts, irregular menstruation. With …
  • View SP 16 (Abdominal Lament)

        3 cun above SP 15 and 4 cun lateral to the anterior midline (CV 11).

        Aids intestinal issues by clearing heat in the intestines and resolving dampness - as well as generally moving the intestines. Noted for undigested food in the stool. Abdominal pain, dysentery, blood in the stool.
  • View ST 37 (Upper Great Hollow)

        6 cun below ST 35, one finger width lateral from the anterior border of the tibia.

        Generally for excess and more acute disorders of the intestines and digestive system involving dampness and/or heat - diarrhea, dysentary, boborygmus, abdominal pain, bloating, distention, constipation. Sea of Blood Point - if excess the …
  • View ST 39 (Lower Great Hollow)

        9 cun below ST 35, one finger width lateral from the anterior border of the tibia.

        Disorders of the Small Intestine organ - abdominal pain, diarrhea, dysentary. SI channel problems - breast issues, mastitis, pain/swelling/numbness along channel. Local point for lower leg issues - pain, numbness, motor control, atrophy.
  • View UB 20 (Spleen Shu)

        1.5 cun lateral to GV 6, level with T11.

        Main point for all Spleen problems from a TCM perspective of both the physical organ functions and the energetic/psychological relationships. Physical spleen issues - distention, abdominal pain, bloating, poor appetite along with more inv…
  • View UB 27 (Small Intestine Shu)

        1.5 cun lateral to GV line, level with 1st PSF.

        Main point for all Small Intestine related issues. Damp heat effecting the bladder (difficult or painful urination, hematuria, dark urine). Damp heat effecting the intestines (diarrhea, hemorrhoids, dysentary). Other lower warmer discha…

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