Fever

Health Issues/Symptoms Connections

"Fever" Issue / Symptom Connections

Below you will find various relationships to, and potential clinical treatment approaches for fever.

It is critical to appreciate that in Chinese Medicine, treatment for "fever" is rarely focused on the symptoms exclusively. Alternatively, a practitioner is looking at the factors that led to the development of "fever" - i.e. the "cause(s)".

For non-practitioners, we recommend reading treating the "cause" and not the "symptoms" for more on the overall approach and the importance of the TCM diagnostic system in formulating treatment approaches.

Within TCM, "fever" is potentially related to one or more of the following diagnostic patterns: blood stagnation, liver fire, liver qi stagnation, lung wind invasion - wind heat, and/or stomach fire.

The above patterns are common examples. In clinical situations, however, there are any number of other possibilities. Many times there will be a layered combination of patterns in an interwoven blend with their symptoms - some being the cause of an issue and the result of another issue. While initially complex, this is illustrative of the the web of relationships that Chinese Medicine is designed to approach.

Some acupuncture points are considered "empirically" related to a specific condition or diagnostic pattern. While this would rarely, if ever, dictate the entire composition of a treatment, the following points should be considered, possibly even more so within the context of acupressure:

  • View EX Huatuojiaji at T1 (Sides of Spine at T1)

        .5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of T1

        T1 innervates the windpipe and affects the bone marrow, used for a range of lung and immune issues (with T2 and T3), a range of neck issues, releasing exterior heat (colds/flus/fever), neck and shoulder problems.  T1, T2 and T3 are used fo…
  • View LI 1 (Metal Yang)

        .1 cun posterior to the corner of the nail on the radial side of the index finger.

        Jing Well Point, for heat, pain, stagnation, especially at the opposite end of the channel, for eye and ear pain and inflammation, toothache. Bleed for high fever, coma  
  • View LI 11 (Pool at the Bend)

        At the lateral end of the transverse cubital crease midway between LU 5 and the lateral epicondyle of the humerus.

        Reduction of high fevers, patients with the 4 bigs, combine with LI 1, LI 2 or LI 4. Damp Heat skin diseases, red, itchy, oozing & inflamed (hives, herpes zoster, acne), may be used with UB 40 for any skin disease. ST Excess Issues, …
  • View ST 44 (Inner Court)

        Proximal to the web margin between the 2nd and 3rd metatarsal bones, in a depression distal and lateral to the 2nd meta…

        Ying Spring Point - Clears heat from the channel and organ - febrile disease with absence of sweating.  Useful for issues of the Face & Jaw along with LI 4 - toothache, facial pain, bell's palsy, stroke, sore throat, eye pain. Damp H…
  • View UB 9 (Jade Pillow)

        1.3 cun lateral to GV 17 or 2.5 cun above the PHL, 1.3 cun lateral to the PML in depression level with GV 17.

        Expels wind-cold - nasal congestion, chills and fever, headaches from wind. Occipital headaches and/or neck pain, heavy head. Eye pain and/or redness, blurry vision. Unbalanced temperature/sweating - cold sensation in head with sweats, …
  • View UB 11 (Great Shuttle)

        1.5 cun lateral to GV 13, level with T1.

        Wind disorders. Hui-meeting point of the bones, useful with any bone or problem such as osteoporosis, arthritis, inflammation, sensation of heat in the bones, etc. Useful adjunctive point to effect the lungs in cases of infections, colds…
  • View UB 12 (Wind Gate)

        1.5 cun lateral to GV line, level with T2.

        Main point to expel wind from the Wei Qi level of the body, useful for early stages of wind-cold conditions (Common cold, cough, fever, headache, stiff neck). Apply moxa here and on ST 36 to strengthen the Wei Qi (or the defensive layer o…
  • View UB 22 (Triple Burner Shu)

        1.5 cun lateral to GV 5, level with L1.

        As Triple Heater Shu this point effects conditions related to imbalances between the upper and lower parts of the body especially those related to water: edema, bloating, ascites, borborygmus, difficult or painful urination, urinary retent…

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