Mai Ya - Barley Sprout, Malt

TCM Materia Medica

Mai Ya TCM Herb Classifications and Usages

The TCM herb "mai ya" which in english is Mai Ya herb"barley sprout, malt", is categorized within the "herbs that relieve food stagnation" functional grouping. It is thought to enter the liver, spleen and stomach channels and exhibits neutral (ping) and sweet (gan) taste/temperature properties.

Dosages and preparations will vary according to each individual and the overall approach of a formula, but generally this herb has the following dosage and/or preparation guidelines:

  • Dosage: 6-15g

Of many possible clinical applications, it may be considered to influence the following issues/symptoms:

  • Reduces food stagnation, strengthens stomach (also useful for infants).
  • Inhibits lactation - for discontinuing nursing, distended and painful breasts.
  • Reduces liver Qi - intercostal or epigastric distention, belching, loss of appetite.

Mai Ya may potentially be used, in coordination with a well tailored formula (in most cases), to influence the following conditions: epigastric pain and/or women's health

While it may not always be included depending on the manufacturer or herbalist making the formula, mai ya is generally included in the following 2 formulas:

ViewChen Xiang Hua Qi Wan (Aquilaria Qi Transforming Pills)

For spleen qi deficiency with damp heat accumulation in the lower.  The spleen system is effectively the western version of the digestive system.  The spleen is responsible for extracting the energy …

ViewJian Pi Wan (Strengthen Spleen Pills)

For stomach and spleen qi deficiency with dampness that has potentially generated mild interior-heat - diarrhea, abdominal pain, poor appetite, epigastric pain. May be used in early pregnancy for mo…

As noted above, mai ya is within the herbs that relieve food stagnation functional group. All the herbs in this category are listed below.

(truncated intro "... food stagnation often arises from emotional disturbances which cause the qi and/or blood to stagnate, improper dietary habits, phlegm, heat, and/or cold disorders. hot/cold types: hot: bad breath, distention, preference for cold food/dr…)".

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