Wu Yao - Lindera Root

TCM Materia Medica

Wu Yao TCM Herb Classifications and Usages

The TCM herb "wu yao" which in english is "lindera root", is categorized within the "herbs that regulate the qi" functional grouping. It is thought to enter the kidney, lung, spleen and urinary bladder channels and exhibits acrid and warm (wen) taste/temperature properties.

Dosages and preparations will vary according to each individual and the overall approach of a formula, but generally this herb has the following dosage and/or preparation guidelines:

  • Dosage: 3-9g

Of many possible clinical applications, it may be considered to influence the following issues/symptoms:

  • Promotes the movement of Qi, alleviates pain by warming and dispersing - flank, chest, epigastric, abdominal pain, hernia, menstrual pains due to cold constraint and qi stagnation.
  • Warms the kidneys - frequent urination or incontinence due to kidney yang deficiency and cold from deficiency of the bladder.

While it may not always be included depending on the manufacturer or herbalist making the formula, wu yao is generally included in the following 3 formulas:

ViewBi Xie Fen Qing Yin Wan (Dioscorea Formula To Separate The Clear)

Generally for painful urination issues (gao lin) that arises from kidney yang deficiency. With related kidney yang deficiency pattern - chronic urinary tract infections, leukorrhea, vaginal thrush. …

ViewGe Xia Zhu Yu Wan (Drive Out Blood Stasis Below The Diaphragm Decoction)

For blood stasis below the diaphgram - abdominal masses, liver and spleen masses/swelling, colitis. A range of liver disorders are possibly applicable - cirrhosis, hepatic hemangioma, hepatitis, jau…

ViewSuo Quan Wan (Shut The Sluice Pills)

Frequent, clear and prolonged urination with difficulty restraining - along with other kidney deficiency signs. Bedwetting in children in many cases, not necessarily just from deficiency.  

As noted above, wu yao is within the herbs that regulate the qi functional group. All the herbs in this category are listed below.

(truncated intro "... used with qi disorders involving deficiency and stagnation. these herbs are primarily used for stagnation involving the spleen and stomach, constrained liver qi, and stagnant lung qi. )".

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